Canadian economy added 35,200 jobs in December, unemployment rate falls

Regionally, Ontario and Quebec led the job gains

The Canadian economy added 35,200 jobs in December, fuelled by a gain in full-time jobs, to post the first monthly increase in jobs since September.

Statistics Canada said Friday the unemployment rate fell to 5.6 per cent for the final month of the year, compared with a rate of 5.9 per cent in November when the country lost 71,200 jobs, the biggest monthly loss of jobs since the financial crisis.

The federal agency’s monthly labour force survey said the increase in the number of jobs in December came as full-time employment rose by 38,400 jobs. The number of part-time jobs fell by 3,200.

The gain in jobs came as the number of private sector employees rose by 56,900, offset by a loss of 21,500 public sector jobs. The number of self-employed fell by 200.

The goods-producing sector added 15,700 jobs, helped by a gain of 17,000 jobs in the construction industry. Meanwhile, the services-producing sector added 19,400 jobs as the accommodation and food services industry gained 24,900 jobs.

Regionally, Ontario and Quebec led the job gains.

Ontario added 25,100 jobs in December, boosted by gains in construction and public administration. Quebec added 21,100 jobs in the month, helped by gains in the accommodation and food services sector as well as manufacturing.

Newfoundland and Labrador lost 5,000 jobs in December.

The Canadian economy added 320,300 jobs for all of 2019 including 282,800 full-time positions and 37,500 part-time jobs.

The jobs report came ahead of the Bank of Canada’s rate decision and monetary policy report later this month.

The central bank has kept its key interest rate on hold at 1.75 per cent for more than a year even as many of its international peers, including the U.S. Federal Reserve, have moved to cut rates and loosen monetary policy in response to weakness in the global economy.

The Bank of Canada has said that the Canadian economy has been resilient despite the global uncertainty caused by the trade war between the United States and China.

The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Water quality advisory issued for Buffalo Lake at Rochon Sands

Elevated levels of fecal bacteria were detected via testing of Buffalo Lake water, at this beach location

Stettler area to welcome new MDF production plant

Great Plains MDF Production Inc building a $750 million straw fibre MDF board plant

Country star Drew Gregory perfoms at Entertainment in the Park Aug. 5th

‘Gregory the singer is also Gregory the farmer – two sides of the same engaging, unpretentious and ‘amiable coin’

QUIZ: A summer’s day on the water

How much do you know about boats and other watercraft?

Wild blank Canucks 3-0 to take early series lead, Stalock earns shutout

‘Our guys did an unbelievable job staying with them’

With loan money gone, restaurants are at mercy of virus

“At this moment, I don’t see getting my full payroll back”

COVID-19 blamed as work on military port first promised in 2007 sees new delay

Stephen Harper first announced plans to build the Nanisivik deep-water port in Nunavut

Canada extends peacekeeping mission despite Security Council loss

Deployment of a CC-130 Hercules in support of UN missions in Africa

Quebec seeing spike in drownings compared to rest of Canada: Lifesaving Society

As of July 31, the province has already reported at least 60 drownings for the year

N.L.’s next premier will be announced today as Liberals elect new party leader

The party is hosting a leadership convention in St. John’s

A weakened Tropical Storm Isaias lashes virus-hit Florida

‘Don’t be fooled by the downgrade’

Wilford Brimley, ‘Cocoon’ and ‘Natural’ actor, dies at 85

He was on dialysis and had several medical ailments

Most Read