Alberta RCMP recover dynamite, explosives and detonators

Located on Alberta properties

RCMP recovered a substantial amount of commercial explosives and detonators on Alberta properties including 205 sticks of dynamite and cordite from the Second World War.

According to Alberta RCMP Cpl. Paul Zanon of the Explosives Disposal Unit (EDU) in Edmonton, the explosives – that weren’t properly disposed of – were recovered between October 2017 and November 2018.

“Explosives and detonators that are not disposed of properly are extremely dangerous and surprisingly common on Alberta properties,” said Cpl. Zanon in a media release. “Historic rules gave Alberta farmers easy access to dynamite and as a result, there is a large quantity of explosives that remain forgotten on properties.”

The EDU recovered 25 kilograms of Geogel, 205 sticks of dynamite, eight slurry explosives, 233 detonators, two-and-half rolls (about 750 metres long) of detonator cord and one bag of cordite (from the Second World War).

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Police remind people not to move or touch explosives.

“Please remember that no matter how old an explosive is, it is still extremely dangerous,” said Cpl. Zanon. “We want Albertans to be safe and the safest thing to do is to call us.”

Anyone who finds explosives or detonators should contact their local police immediately. Citizens are reminded not to move or touch explosives and providing a picture and an approximate age is helpful. RCMP EDU is trained to safely dispose of explosives and detonators and there is no cost to the public for this service.

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The RCMP didn’t say where in Alberta the explosives and dynamite were retrieved.



lisa.joy@stettlerindependent.com

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