Canadian border guards seize about 1,350 grams of heroin

Charge a 38-year-old foreign national woman

Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) seized about 1,350 grams of heroin – 13,500 individual doses – and arrested a woman at the Calgary Airport.

According to Sgt. Ryan Smart, RCMP Federal Policing Calgary, the CBSA intercepted Mariam Salehe, 38, a foreign national, attempting to smuggle in the heroin on Nov. 22.

“She had swallowed numerous heroin pellets in efforts to avoid detection,” said Sgt. Smart in a press release.

In addition, she had heroin concealed in her suitcase.

View this post on Instagram

#Breaking: Internal carrier intercepted by CBSA officers at Calgary Intl Airport; approx. 1350 g of suspected heroin seized, incl. 24 pellets. This is enough to produce approx. 13,500 doses!‎ A 38 year-old female traveller was arrested and turned over to @RCMPAlberta where she faces two charges pursuant to Controlled Drugs and Substances Act. She is to appear in Calgary Provincial Court on December 7, 2018. “Ingesting narcotics to evade detection is extremely dangerous and life-threatening. CBSA officers have not only potentially saved a life, but have also disrupted drug smugglers and organized crime activities in order to protect Canadians.” Nina Patel – RDG, CBSA Prairie Region. This is an excellent example of the strong partnership between the CBSA and the RCMP and their shared commitment ‎to keeping drugs off the streets and protecting Canadians.

A post shared by Canada Border Services Agency (@canborder) on

The Calgary RCMP Federal Serious and Organized Crime Team conducted the subsequent criminal investigation and laid charges of importation of a controlled substance and possession for the purpose of trafficking.

RELATED: ‘It’s an epidemic:’ Inexpensive crystal meth eclipsing opioids on the Prairies

Salehe was remanded in custody and appears in Calgary Provincial Court on Dec. 7.

“Opiates, such as heroin and fentanyl have steadily become more popular in Canada where it is one of the most prevalent street drugs behind marihuana and cocaine,” said Sgt. Smart. “Opiates continue to be the most lethal drug as their use will often lead to an overdose resulting in death.”



lisa.joy@stettlerindependent.com

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